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About Allie

Allie graduated from NYU in December 2015 with a degree in Psychology and minors in social work and media studies. She studied abroad in Paris, and yes, speaks French (sadly, better than her native Chinese). She’s a born-and-bred New Yorker.

She started as an intern for WPIX the summer before her sophomore year, and grew into a freelance digital producer until May 2016. Now she’s working (and growing and learning) as a digital coordinator at The View at ABC.

She loves to cover stories about women’s fight for equality. She guiltily enjoys entertainment and pop culture stories. She loves Reddit, traveling, watching other people cook, the Witcher series, and savasana.

Social Media:

Emmy. Nominated. (Part 2)

On September 24, 2015, Pope Francis made a historic trip to New York. I got to skip some of my final days in school to attend his evening prayer at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City for WPIX’s digital coverage.

Continue reading “Emmy. Nominated. (Part 2)”

Women in the World

I’m a feminist. It’s not such a scary word! I believe women should have equal opportunities to achieve happiness and success as men do. No, I don’t hate men. 😒

As we (women) take steps forward (and some steps back) in the political, economic, social, etc. realms of the world, I am dedicated to giving attention to this journey.

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A Sea of Blue

After the officers involved in the death of Eric Garner failed to be indicted, the entire country rose up in one of the most polarizing movements I had ever seen. Most New Yorkers I knew chose to stand with cops, completely, or with the Black Lives Matter, completely. It was one pitted against another, white vs. black, establishment vs. anti-establishment, with nothing “on the fence.”

When Detective Ramos and Liu were brutally murdered as a retaliation to the verdict, I was chosen to represent our station’s digital team at their funerals. It was an emotional time, undoubtedly. Thousands of officers from around the country, and some who crossed the border from Canada, came to pay their respects for two good men who lost their lives senselessly. But that wasn’t all that was newsworthy — their deaths became a platform on which political statements could be made. Some officers turned their back on Mayor de Blasio, seeing these officers’ deaths as his betrayal.

Continue reading “A Sea of Blue”