Emmy. Nominated. (Part 1)

A little late on this … but I got nominated for an Emmy Award.

Off the bat, I want to say I recognize proportionately little of my own work brought me here. I put in work and the rest was luck and people who loved me, gave me a chance and lifted me up.

Continue reading “Emmy. Nominated. (Part 1)”

Emmy. Nominated. (Part 2)

On September 24, 2015, Pope Francis made a historic trip to New York. I got to skip some of my final days in school to attend his evening prayer at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City for WPIX’s digital coverage.

Continue reading “Emmy. Nominated. (Part 2)”

On Coffee, Fish Eyeballs, and the 2016 Election

To this day, I can’t fathom spending $4 on a cup of coffee — the roadside cup is great, as long as it’s light and sweet enough. Kyle, on the other hand, will buy a $20 pack of roasted beans from his favorite shop in LA, that he’ll fly back to New York and grind it by hand every morning and brew in his Aeropress. It’s a sacred, 10-minute process. I love him for this little ritual and respect him so thoroughly for the effort he puts in. Who am I to judge what makes him happy?

Continue reading “On Coffee, Fish Eyeballs, and the 2016 Election”

The Subway’s Narrative

The lines and stops forming a circulatory system of the city, a paint-by-number, dizzying puzzle for the uninitiated, carves its own story for each soul that lets them flow through long enough.

The ABC boy whose father watches him play classics and collect tips has been defined by his beats at Times and Union Square. The basketball teams and showtime performers are defined by the rush hours and long interludes in tunnels they trap their victims in.

The time I divided and donated to steamy, dusty halls showed exactly who and what I was obligated to, or more importantly, made the effort to travel for. They say you’re not a New Yorker until you’ve cried in a crowded car. Perhaps instead it becomes a part of your identity when you define yourself by red, yellow and green lines and numbered street names. Perhaps instead when you’ve navigated alone, leaning over another poor traveler to see the map. Perhaps instead when you take the G into the middle of Queens at 2 a.m. — until you give up and take an Uber instead.

I’ve written about many parts of New York as if the city was a man who persistently breaks and mends my heart. Of course, the city is old and comprised of moving, conflicting pieces — it has a personality like no other. The subway is no different.

About Allie

Allie graduated from NYU in December 2015 with a degree in Psychology and minors in social work and media studies. She studied abroad in Paris, and yes, speaks French (sadly, better than her native Chinese). She’s a born and bred New Yorker.

She started as an intern for WPIX the summer before her sophomore year, and grew into a freelance digital producer until May 2016. Now she’s working (and growing and learning) as a digital coordinator at The View at ABC.

She loves to cover stories about women’s fight for equality. She guiltily enjoys entertainment and pop culture stories. She loves Reddit, traveling, watching other people cook, the Witcher series, and savasana.

Social Media:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A Sea of Blue

After the officers involved in the death of Eric Garner failed to be indicted, the entire country rose up in one of the most polarizing movements I had ever seen. Most New Yorkers I knew chose to stand with cops, completely, or with the Black Lives Matter, completely. It was one pitted against another, white vs. black, establishment vs. anti-establishment, with nothing “on the fence.”

When Detective Ramos and Liu were brutally murdered as a retaliation to the verdict, I was chosen to represent our station’s digital team at their funerals. It was an emotional time, undoubtedly. Thousands of officers from around the country, and some who crossed the border from Canada, came to pay their respects for two good men who lost their lives senselessly. But that wasn’t all that was newsworthy — their deaths became a platform on which political statements could be made. Some officers turned their back on Mayor de Blasio, seeing these officers’ deaths as his betrayal.

Continue reading “A Sea of Blue”